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Nice to meet you.

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Transparency in a budget helps us work out what is achievable for project, and allow us to get the best result for your goals.

What are you after? A website? Brand strategy & communications? And what are your goals? What do you want to achieve?

We're excited. We can't wait to meet.
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Marcel McCarthy

June 28, 2020

Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman

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Thinking about how you think.

June 30, 2020

Marcel McCarthy

Marcel McCarthy

Creative Director

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Can I ask you a few questions?

2 + 2? Four. What colour are Ferraris? Red, right? Lamborghinis are yellow.

You knew the answer to all of these prompts without having to think about it. They were intuitive. How did it come to you without a quick Google? Or the need to pull out the calculator or perhaps the counting beans? While 2+2 does always equal 4, at least in this universe, Ferraris aren't always red. Yet that doesn't stop us assuming it.

If instead, I were to ask you what 24 x 17 was, it's unlikely you'd know what the answer was, off the top of your head. You'd need to stop, think, and work out the solution. Why are one set of questions obvious, and others requiring deep thought, calculation, and process?

These are simple examples showing the very present split in how our brains process information. In Thinking Fast and Slow, Kahnemen presents just that, pulling the curtain back, and showing how our brain utilises two different systems, one fast, the other slow.

System 1 is 'fast, intuitive, and emotional.' It doesn't take much effort, but this type of thinking can cause us trouble in business and our personal lives. Why? Well, what if our intuition is wrong? Kahnemen suggests it often is. For all its convenience, these cognitive biases get us into trouble from time to time. The lazy part of our brains is overconfident and doesn't look at the evidence. He argues that there are many benefits to taking the slower path, the 'System 2' path, of consideration and deliberation.

Ultimately these systems shape our decisions and judgement; how we see the world, and our place in it. The book looks at this dynamic in our societies, businesses, and individual lives. Providing illuminating examples, you'll start thinking about your thinking differently. You might even start considering how others think, and how these processes show up in everyday decisions. Understanding this when it comes to marketing and brand engagement can be incredibly powerful. How people make the decisions they do can be more important than the actual decision itself.

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